10 Most Followed Charities

By Charity Navigator Since Charity Navigator launched in 2002, hundreds of thousands of donors that have become registered users of our site. Registered users have access to (free) premier tools on our site including the ability to share a list of charities, compare charities, view historical data and subscribe to our monthly, email newsletter. Registered users can also create personal portfolios of charities to track the performance of their favorite charities overtime. The 10 charities that have been most frequently added to registered users’ portfolios are listed below. They are ranked by the number of portfolios that include them. …read more

Source:: Charity

10 Highly Rated Charities Relying on Private Contributions

By Charity Navigator Most charities derive large chunks of revenue from earned income, membership fees, and government contracts and grants. Ranked by overall score, these 10 excellent charities draw revenue solely from direct and indirect public support. They report no government funding, no membership fees, and no revenue from earned income.
As a result, more than 95% of their total revenue comes from private contributions, which makes the efficiency of their fundraising operations all the more impressive. …read more

Source:: Charity

10 Highly Paid CEOs at Low-Rated Charities

By Charity Navigator For charities to be successful, they need talented, experienced leaders. Those leaders command significant compensation. But highly compensated CEOs should also get the most out of the organizations they lead. The leaders of these 10 organizations all have compensation above $200,000 and are among the highest-paid executives of all charities of a similar size. Yet their organizations have very low overall ratings on Charity Navigator – either 1 star or zero stars. …read more

Source:: Charity

10 Consistently Low Rated Charities

By Charity Navigator These ten charities have earned the most consecutive 0-star, “extremely poor” ratings meaning they consistently perform far below industry standards and below nearly all similar charities. …read more

Source:: Charity

Charitable Chinese Tycoon to Offer Dinner for One Thousand Struggling Americans

Chen Guangbio is well known in China for his charitable contributions to social responsibility.  Valued at an estimated fortune of over four hundred million dollars, Chen has seen to reinvesting his money in environmental issues striking against China.  In 2008, after the Sichuan earthquake that killed sixty nine thousand people and rendered an additional eighteen thousand missing, Chen contributed millions of dollars towards the relief effort.  He also actively took part in the endeavor, personally saving thirteen individuals in the aftermath.

Chen continued his charitable contributions in 2013, as he tried to tackle the heavy air pollution affecting his nation by selling canned air in Beijing and Shanghai.  The project was rather audacious, as Chen canned specifically creatively titled supplies in soda cans; some titles included ‘pristine Tibet,’ and ‘post-industrial Taiwan.’  The air was collected from revolutionary regions and bottled in the cans for approximately eighty cents a can.  In essence, Chen sought to make the point that China’s air pollution had become such a large issue, that even the thought of buying clean air from a soda can could no longer be seen as ridiculous.

According to an article recently completed by RT, Chen is now seeking to share his charitable nature with an ever further reach.  The millionaire published two advertisements this week to announce an event he will be holding on the twenty-fifth of June at the Loeb Boathouse in Central Park in New York City.  The ads were placed in both The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal; the content was written by Chen himself and was available in both Chinese and English.  The ad announced that one thousand poor Americans were invited to dinner, which will be covered by Chen; at the end of the evening, every attendee will also receive three hundred American dollars.

When asked for what his intention behind the dinner was, Chen acknowledged that he has met many successful and rich Chinese officials who splurge on luxury items for themselves.  On top of this already heinous spending, most of these tycoons have earned their money through products that have destroyed the environment.  Chen declares that he wishes to be different than these industry tycoons; he wants to show Americans that not all Chinese business leaders are selfish and snobbish with their acquired funds.  He also hopes this could help smooth over some strains in United States-China relations.  In the past, the United States has offered services and funds to relieve China’s suffering at the hands of natural disasters; Chen feels it is only fair if he offer to do the same.

 

London’s charities have little faith in Work Programme, finds report

Lack of voluntary and community sector (VCS) involvement in the Work Programme has the potential to worsen rather than improve employment inequalities in the Capital, according to the London Voluntary Service Council (LVCS). …read more

Source:: Charity 2

Online research community launched

A “one-stop knowledge resource” has been launched by the Third Sector Research Centre. …read more

Source:: Charity 2

Company payroll giving success recognised

Whitbread has been recognised for its fundraising efforts at the 2011 National Payroll Giving Excellence Awards. …read more

Source:: Charity 2

The database: statistics/finance/fundraising – August

Work needs to be done to encourage more people from deprived areas to participate in civic activity, figures from the Third Sector Research Centre have indicated. …read more

Source:: Charity 2

The database: giving trends — August

Every month, CharityInsight, in partnership with The iD Factor, conducts exclusive research into the giving habits of the general public. …read more

Source:: Charity 2